Fall 2014 Talk Schedule

How To Fix the World: Repair as Practice and Worldview

Dec. 4
11 am – 12 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg, South Wing

Speaker: Steven Jackson, Associate Professor, Department of Information Science, Cornell University

Steven Jackson (http://www.infosci.cornell.edu/sjackson/) is an Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Information Science at Cornell University. He works in the areas of science and technology policy, human-computer interaction, and the sociology of technology, with current empirical projects around computational development in the sciences; time, technology and social life; and programs of technology and social change in the developing world. His work has been supported by the Ford Foundation, World Bank, Social Science Research Council, Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing, and several awards from the U.S. National Science Foundation, including the recent NSF CAREER award, “Governing Collaborative Science: Cyberinfrastructure, Scale, and Governance in the Networked Ecological Sciences.”

Abstract:
This talk argues for maintenance and repair as an alternative ground and starting point for reimagining human relationships with technology.  Drawing on recent and older work in ethics, philosophy, and the humanities, and programs of fieldwork in Africa, Bangladesh, and North America, it points to a deep imbalance in our academic and popular stories around technology. It also offers a series of repair-centered alternatives that, taken seriously, might change the way we approach questions of design, practice, value, and imagination in information science research.

 

How Do You Change Science? An exploration of ‘computing identities’ and digital infrastructures in institutional change

Dec. 1
11 am – 12 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg, South Wing

Speaker:
Nicholas Berente, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia

Abstract:
The institution of science is changing. Current work on institutional change emphasizes the identities that actors draw upon to enact the scripts that change prevailing, well-entrenched institutions over time. We conduct a grounded exploration of the identity work associated with a particular institutional change – the evolution of computational science. Specifically, through interviews with 55 leaders and managers of cyberinfrastructure organizations, we look into the relationship between their identities and the evolution of the digital infrastructure upon which the institutional patterns of computational science evolve. We identify three themes in their identity work: (1) organizational identities as a mechanism through which identity work changes institutions – and the particular form of “computing identity” integral to this particular change; (2) the nested nature of individual identities with organizational identities; and (3) the liminal character of identities over time throughout the course of institutional change.

 

Graduate Student Lightning Talks, Round 2

Nov. 25
11 am – 12 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg, South Wing

 

Automatic Image Annotation Applied to Habitat Classification

Nov. 11
2 pm – 3 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg, South Wing

Speaker:
Mercedes Torres, PhD  
As a post-­‐doctoral student at the University of Nottingham, she is focused on interdisciplinary research, specifically inthe area of Fine-­‐Grained Visual Categorization, Image Processing and Analysis, and Machine Learning. She has designed and developedan image annotation framework for Phase 1 habitat classification in ground-­‐taken photographs.

Abstract:
Currently, habitat classification (the process of mapping an area with the habitats present on it) is carried out by human surveyors.This is expensive, time consuming, laborious and subjective. What I have done is develop the first complete automatic alternative for the Phase 1 classification Scheme, widely used in the UK. The problems itself is quite complicated, giving the semantic similarities between theclasses I have to recognize. I have approached habitat classification as an image annotation problem and created a complete framework forit, composed of 5 elements: the source data, features extracted from these data (low and medium), a novel machine learning classifier calledRandom Projection Forests and a location-­‐ based voting system for my classifier. Moreover, I have used a novel source of information asthe input of this framework: ground-­‐taken geo-­‐referenced photographs (which can be photographs taken with a mobile phone). Currentstate-­‐of-­‐the-­‐art normally uses remote-­‐sensed imagery, but this is not detailed enough to distinguish between vegetation species, etc.,so ground-­‐taken photos are actually better alternatives. Additionally, I have created a new ensemble classifier, called Random ProjectionForests and based on Random Forests, but much more efficient and accurate. Results show that my complete framework can successfullyclassify 7 out of the 10 main classes of Phase 1, which is quite good considering that this type of work has never been done before with thetype of data I am using and the approach I have chosen.

 

“Reinventing Science Education through Virtual Worlds: Implications for Teacher Education”

Nov. 11
11 am – 12 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg, South Wing

Speaker:
Diane Jass Ketelhut, Associate Professor, College of Education, UMD

Abstract:
The 21st century brings a change in what we value as expertise, but is the USA educational system responding to these new needs? Focusing on science education as an example, I argue that the answer is no. The skills and habits of mind of today’s scientists are not being developed or experienced in science classrooms, particularly around aspects of scientific inquiry. In this presentation, I discuss how science and science education have diverged, and propose the use of emerging technologies such as serious computer games to model and provide more authentic science learning experiences for children, using examples from my own research. I conclude with discussing the implications of this new approach to teaching science for teacher education and higher ed.

 

Privacy Notices as Tabula Rasa: An empirical investigation into how complying with a privacy notice is related to meeting privacy expectations online.

Oct. 28
11 am – 12 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg, South Wing

Speaker:
Kirsten Martin, Assistant Professor of Strategic Management and Public Policy at the George Washington University’s School of Business

Abstract:
Recent work has focused on the failure of adequate notice and consumer choice as a tool to address consumers’ privacy expectations online. However, a direct examination of how complying with privacy notice is related to meeting privacy expectations online has not been performed. This paper reports the findings of an empirical examination of how judgments about privacy notices are related to privacy expectations. Two factorial vignette studies describing online consumer tracking asked respondents to rate the degree online scenarios met consumers’ privacy expectations or complied with a privacy notice. The results suggest respondents perceived the privacy notice as offering greater protections than the actual privacy notice. Perhaps most problematic, respondents projected the important factors of their privacy expectations onto the privacy notice. In other words, privacy notices became a tabula rasa for users’ privacy expectations. The findings provide guidance for policy makers and for firms to avoid unnecessary and unintentional privacy violations caused by an over reliance on privacy notices.

 

Violence and Financial Decisions: Evidence from Mobile Money in Afghanistan

Oct. 21
12pm
Hornbake Bldg, South Wing

Speaker:
Joshua Blumenstock, University of Washington, Information School

Abstract:
We present the results from a study on the relationship between violence and the financial decisions made by Afghan citizens.  Our analysis combines “big data” on financial and mobile money transactions with “small data” from a randomized experiment in Afghanistan.  We discuss three related results.  First, combining detailed information on the entire universe of mobile money transactions in Afghanistan with administrative records for all violent incidents recorded by international forces, we find a negative relationship between violence and mobile money use.  Second, we present the results of a field experiment in Afghanistan that was designed to measure the social and economic impacts of mobile money. In the context of this randomized control trial, violence is associated with decreased mobile money use and greater cash balances.  Third, in financial survey data from 19 of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces, we find that individuals experiencing violence hold more cash. Collectively, the evidence indicates that violence has a causal impact on financial decision-making, and that this is principally because of concerns about future violence. The degree of the relationship between cash holdings and violence is large enough to suggest that robust formal financial networks face severe challenges developing in conflict environments.

Archival Diasporas: A Framework for Understanding the Complexities and Challenges of Dispersed Photographic Collections

Oct. 14
11 am – 12 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg, South Wing

Speaker:
Ricky Punzalan

It is not uncommon for archival photographs to appear in multiple copies, versions, or formats. Photographs of the same provenance are often found in various locations or housed in several institutions. Format diversity, duplication, and dispersion pose profound challenges for archivists attempting to represent photographic images scattered across many institutions. This article identifies four dimensions of archival dispersion—geographical, temporal, provenancial, and material—that simultaneously act as barriers for providing consolidated representation of dispersed photographs. Understanding the context and nature of dispersion is key to effective representation of photographs in archival custody. “Archival Diaspora” explores the complicated nature of distributed collections.

 

Graduate Student Lightning Talks, Round 1

Oct. 7
11 am – 12 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg, South Wing

 

“Building in silico streetscapes with muscles, machines, and morsels of data”

Sep. 16
11 am – 12 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg, South Wing

Speaker:
Paul M. Torrens, Associate Professor & Director,
Center for Geospatial Information Science,
University of Maryland

 

CASCI Fall Seminar Series Kickoff Event : “What I did on my summer vacation”

Sep. 2
11 am – 12 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg, South Wing

(9/2, 11am, Hornbake 2116), We’ll have several iSchool faculty members share their current research projects in what we’re calling, “What I did on my summer vacation.”

Speaker:
June Ahn, Katie Shilton, Ricky Punzalan, Susan Winter