Fall 2013 Talk Schedule

School District Governance, Knowledge-Fit, and Decision Rights: How School Districts Recruit and Hire School Librarians

[CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER – TO BE RESCHEDULED SPRING 2014]

Dec. 10, 11 am – 12 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg, South Wing

Abstract:
In school district administration, principals are often given decision rights regarding recruiting and hiring school librarians. Research indicates those with the specific knowledge of school libraries at the administrative level, namely school library district supervisors, often are not consulted about these decisions.

Through comparative case studies of three to five school districts, this dissertation research will look at the decision-making processes concerning the recruiting and hiring of school librarians. It will use a theoretical lens based on research in IT governance that determines decision rights based on knowledge-fit. Data will be collected through interviews with principals, individuals in human resources, library supervisors, and school librarians.

Currently, data from a preliminary survey is being analyzed to determine how to group school districts based on the school district library supervisor’s participation in the recruiting and hiring process. Previous research by the Lilead Project at UMD indicates different levels of involvement, but not at the nuanced level required to group school districts and then choose districts as case studies representative of different groups (e.g. districts where the supervisor indicates no involvement in hiring, little involvement in hiring, some involvement, or complete control).

Contributions of the study include recommendations regarding the organizational structure surrounding recruiting and hiring decisions of school librarians, policy suggestions for more effective recruiting and hiring, and strategies to help library supervisors become more involved in the process as advocates and leaders for their school librarians.

Speaker Bio: Jeffrey DiScala is a Ph.D. candidate at the iSchool. He completed his MLS with a focus in school librarianship at the University of Maryland before becoming a middle school librarian in Prince George’s County. His research interests include the evolving role of the school librarian and school library programs; information, technology, and education policy and standards; and social media and technology in education. When he grows up he wants to be an apocalyptic fiction writer.

 

Dec. 3
11 am – 12 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg, South Wing

Speaker:
Heng Xu, NSF Program Officer for  program officer for Secure and Trustworthy Computing (SaTC) in the Social, Behavioral, and Economics (SBE) at NSF

UMD Outreach Xu


 

The role of new Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in information and communication in science.  A conceptual framework and empirical study.

Nov. 26
11 am – 12 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg, South Wing

Speaker:
Christina K. Pikas

Abstract:
Communication is the essence of science” (Garvey, 1979) and a good deal of that communication is happening online in media popularized in the past 25 years.  How do scientists make meaning of these new media? Are they totally new or are they just new channels for the same communication purposes and roles that have been thoroughly studied over the past century?  In my dissertation, I build a comprehensive framework of communication in science based on communication, library science, social studies of science, and other literatures.  I then use two case studies to further develop and test this framework.  The framework will be useful in understanding the next new medium and will help designers develop new tools based on what we know about communication in science.  This talk will provide an overview of the framework and present preliminary results from the first case study on how geoscientists use Twitter.

Speaker Bio – Christina K. Pikas is a PhD Candidate at the University of Maryland iSchool. She holds a BS in Physics and an MLS, both from the University of Maryland. Ms. Pikas also works as a science and technology librarian at a university affiliated research center. She served as an officer in the US Navy. Her research interests include scholarly communication in science, online communities, information retrieval, and science and technology studies.

 

Carrots or Sticks for Staying Committed to Exercise

Nov. 25 
12 pm – 1 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg, South Wing

Speaker:
Tracy Xiao Liu

Abstract:
An emerging research area in behavioral economics focuses on incentives and commitment to health behavior. In this talk, Tracy Liu will talk about her work in applying methods from behavioral economics to help college students to commit to exercise. Specifically, she will discuss the effect of different incentives on the success of commitment and how the language used in weekly reminders for commitment affects individual behavior.

Speaker Bio:
Tracy Xiao Liu is an assistant professor at the Department of Economics, School of Economics and Management, Tsinghua University. She graduated from the School of Information, University of Michigan in 2012. As an experimental and behavioral economist, she is interested in using theories from both economics and social psychology to solve real-life problems, e.g., the design of crowdsourcing labor market and behavioral health management. Her work has been accepted in journals including Management Science and Games and Economic Behavior.

Homepage: http://www.tracyxliu.com/

 

NSF Funding Overview

Nov 12
11 am – 12 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg.

Speaker:
Susan Winter, Lecturer and Assistant Program Director College of Information Studies University of Maryland

Abstract:
Based on her recent experience as a Program Officer and Science Assistant at NSF, Susan Winter describes the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) proposal solicitation and review processes as well as strategies for writing competitive proposals. The focus is on identifying relevant programs of interest to college faculty and understanding their requirements and guidelines.

Speaker Bio – Dr. Susan Winter is a Lecturer and Assistant Program Director of the Master of Information Management (MIM) program at the iSchool, University of Maryland (UMD). Before joining the faculty at UMD, Susan was Program Director of Cyberinfrastructure at the National Science Foundation. She received her PhD from the University of Arizona, her MA from the Claremont Graduate University, and her BA from the University of California, Berkeley. She has more than 20 years of international managerial and consulting experience. Her research on the impact of information and communication technology on the organization of work has resulted in more than 20 publications, seven grants, and 30 refereed conference presentations (including three Best Paper awards).

 

Graph Databases and other Big Data Technologies in Practice at PricewaterhouseCoopers

Oct. 29
3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg.

Speakers:
Shay Andersen, Brian Miller, and Kevin Schumacher from PwC’s Forensic Technology Solutions (FTS) team (http://www.pwc.com/us/en/forensic-services/technology-solutions.jhtml) will be visiting the iSchool to talk about their experience with Big Data technologies such as NoSQL, Hadoop, and graph databases.

PwC Forensic Technology Solutions

PwC’s Forensic Technology Solutions (FTS) team provides unique approaches to complex business dispute and investigative matters. They combine data analysis techniques, information technology tools, joint business relationships with other leading providers, information management principles, and their understanding of the unusual environment created by investigative and dispute matters to help their clients make informed decisions.

PwC’s global FTS practice has over 350 dedicated forensic technology professionals in 35 countries. The FTS network is comprised of accountants, Certified Fraud Examiners (CFE), Encase Certified Examiners (EnCE), Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (CAMS), Certified Information Systems Security Professionals (CISSP), Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA), Electronic Records Management Master (ERMm), and MBAs.

Using their Forensic Technology Solutions Centers and innovative joint business relationships with leading organizations, they offer the latest technology to best serve their clients’ needs.

FTS services include:

  • Forensic and regulatory analytics
  • E-Discovery response
  • Information risk management
  • Cyber crime and data breach investigations
  • IT expert witness services

 

New Directions in Open, Online Education

Oct. 29
11 am – 12 pm
2116 Hornbake Bldg.

Speaker:
J. Philipp Schmidt

Abstract:
Open education resources, online learning, and massively open online courses (MOOCs) have become prominent developments in education. In this talk, Philipp Schmidt will talk about his experiences in the open education movement, P2PU, and his work in designing learning innovations at the MIT Media Lab. He will discuss his thoughts on the place of MOOCs in education and what other directions in online learning present more exciting opportunities for future design and research about learning.

Speaker Bio:
J. Philipp Schmidt is executive director and co-founder of Peer 2 Peer University (P2PU)–the grassroots community for social open learning. An open education activist, he co-authored the Cape Town Open Education Declaration, served as a founding board member for the OpenCourseWare Consortium, and has been awarded Shuttleworth and Ashoka fellowships. He is currently a Director’s Fellow at the MIT Media Lab.

Homepage: http://web.media.mit.edu/~ps1/

P2PU: https://www.p2pu.org/en/

 

Speech Engines

Oct. 15
11 am – 12 pm
2119 Hornbake Bldg.

Speaker: James Grimmelmann, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland

Abstract:
Academic and regulatory debates about Google are dominated by two opposing theories of what search engines are and how law should treat them. Some describe search engines as passive, neutral conduits for websites’ speech; others describe them as active, opinionated editors: speakers in their own right. The conduit and editor theories give dramatically different policy prescriptions in areas ranging from antitrust to copyright. But they both systematically discount search users’ agency, regarding users merely as passive audiences.

A better theory is that search engines are not primarily conduits or editors, but advisors. They help users achieve their diverse and individualized information goals by sorting through the unimaginable scale and chaos of the Internet. Search users are active listeners, affirmatively seeking out the speech they wish to receive. Search engine law can help them by ensuring two things: access to high-quality search engines, and loyalty from those search engines.

The advisor theory yields fresh insights into long-running disputes about Google. It suggests, for example, a new approach to deciding when Google should be liable for giving a website the “wrong” ranking. Users’ goals are too subjective for there to be an absolute standard of correct and incorrect rankings; different search engines necessarily assess relevance differently. But users are also entitled to complain when a search engine deliberately misleads them about its own relevance assessments. The result is a sensible, workable compromise between the conduit and editor theories.

Speaker Bio – James Grimmelmann is Professor of Law at the University of Maryland and has taught at New York Law School and the Georgetown University Law Center. He holds a J.D. from Yale Law School and an A.B. in computer science from Harvard College. Prior to law school, he worked as a programmer for Microsoft. He has served as a Resident Fellow of the Information Society Project at Yale, and as a law clerk to the Honorable Maryanne Trump Barry of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.

He studies how the law governing the creation and use of computer software affects individual freedom and the distribution of wealth and power in society. As a lawyer and technologist, he aims to help these two groups speak intelligibly to each other. He writes about copyright, search engines, privacy, and other topics in computer and Internet law. He is the author of the casebook Internet Law: Cases and Problems (Semaphore Press 2011). Other significant publications include Future Conduct and the Limits of Class-Action Settlements, 91, N.C. L. Rev. 387 (2013); Sealand, HavenCo, and the Rule of Law, 2012 U. Ill. L. Rev. 405; The Internet Is a Semicommons; 78 Fordham L. Rev. 2799 (2010); and Saving Facebook, 94 Iowa L. Rev. 1137 (2009). He is a Contributing Editor for Publishers Weekly; he and his students created the Public Index website to inform the public about the Google Books settlement.

He has been blogging since 2000 at the Laboratorium (http://laboratorium.net/). His home page is at http://james.grimmelmann.net/.

 

Charting Collections of Connections in Social Media: Creating Maps and Measures with NodeXL

Oct. 2
9 am – 11 am
Room 2115, Art-Sociology Building

Abstract:
Networks are a data structure common found across all social media services that allow populations to author collections of connections.  The Social Media Research Foundation‘s NodeXL project makes analysis of social media networks accessible to most users of the Excel spreadsheet application.  With NodeXL, Networks become as easy to create as pie charts.  Applying the tool to a range of social media networks has already revealed the variations present in online social spaces.  A review of the tool and images of Twitter, flickr, YouTube, and email networks will be presented.

NodeXL workshop co-organized by Alan Neustadtl (Sociology) and Brian Butler (iSchool, Center for the Advanced Study of Communities and Information (CASCI)).

 

Collaborative Science: Designing the Future

Oct. 1
11 am – 12 pm
2116 Hornbake Building

Speaker:
Susan Winter

Abstract:
Institutes, centers, labs, and consortia are often created to coordinate and enable collaborative research. These kinds of arrangements play a central role in focusing innovation on societal needs. They allow scientists and educators to engage complex intellectual challenges through multi-disciplinary, distributed collaboration.  The current innovation ecology requires the creation of these meso-scale science institutions to engage grand societal challenges, but the domain scientists who design and manage them usually aren’t experts in organizations and organizing. In this presentation, I present a framework for the most essential issues in the design and management of meso-scale science institutions with an emphasis on making good choices informed by existing knowledge and an understanding of specific contexts.

Speaker Bio – Dr. Susan Winter is a Lecturer and Assistant Program Director of the Master of Information Management (MIM) program at the iSchool, University of Maryland (UMD). Before joining the faculty at UMD, Susan was Program Director of Cyberinfrastructure at the National Science Foundation. She received her PhD from the University of Arizona, her MA from the Claremont Graduate University, and her BA from the University of California, Berkeley. She has more than 20 years of international managerial and consulting experience. Her research on the impact of information and communication technology on the organization of work has resulted in more than 20 publications, seven grants, and 30 refereed conference presentations (including three Best Paper awards).

 

Learning through teaching: Atlas.ti and Social Media

Sept. 17
12pm – 1pm
2116 Hornbake Building

Speaker:
Andrea Potgieter

Abstract:
Social Media is no longer a foreign concept in the current business environment. Companies, for the most part, understand the value that an effective Social Media strategy can add. Firstly, this talk will reflect on the possible use of ATLAS.ti in analyzing user interaction on Social Media platforms, in order to generate feedback that may assist companies in developing and maintaining a customer-focused Social Media strategy. The speaker will also discuss the decision to apply ATLAS.ti for this specific purpose, as well as the challenges and victories that were faced in introducing a post-graduate student to this tool.

Speaker Bio: Andrea Potgieter is a lecturer at the University of Johannesburg’s Department of Information & Knowledge Management. Her research focus is on Social Media and she has a keen interest in Competitive Intelligence Strategies and Tools.